Starting from today, all Guests visiting the Walt Disney World Resort will notice that the theme parks have adopted a new pricing structure that introduces three new "seasons": Value (low crowds), Regular, and Peak (summer, holidays).
Guests wanting to buy one-day tickets for either of the four Walt Disney parks will first need to check online to see which kind of ticket they'll need to purchase in order to be able to enter the park(s) on the specific date they have chosen.

Before sharing the details, here's the announcement about this change, from the Disney Parks Blog:

"As you may have read in the news, the demand for Disney Parks continues to grow, particularly during peak periods. At the same time, we have an unwavering commitment to exceeding the expectations of all our guests. That is why we continue to expand our parks with new attractions like those noted above, as well as entire new themed lands based on AVATAR, Star Wars and “Toy Story.”

It is also why we continue to look for ways to help spread out visitation. So, beginning tomorrow, we are shifting to seasonal pricing for 1-Day tickets. It’s an approach that you are probably familiar with from many other areas, including sports, entertainment and travel.

How does it work? Each month is divided into value, regular and peak days with an 8-11 month calendar available for viewing online. Here’s an example: if guests plan their visit for September, they’ll have a variety of options, including many days in the value period, which will give them the opportunity to pay less for a 1-Day ticket. If they plan to visit during a peak period, like the winter holidays, they will pay more. Purchasing a 1-Day ticket in a non-peak period, or choosing multi-day tickets and annual passes, will provide additional flexibility and value."

Single-Day Theme Park Tickets

As outlined above, Guests now have to choose a ticket either (1) valid for one admission to Magic Kingdom park only, or (2) valid for one admission to one of the following only: Epcot, Disney’s Hollywood Studios or Disney’s Animal Kingdom theme park. Tickets are priced by Peak, Regular and Value seasons. Peak, Regular and Value validity dates continue to be added to the calendar from time to time, so please check back often. The dates assigned to each of these seasons and the number of days in each of these seasons may change from year to year.

The 1-Day Peak, Regular and Value Tickets must be used by December 31, 2017, but the amount paid for an unused, expired ticket may be applied towards the purchase of a new ticket at the current price, so long as the new ticket price is equal to or greater than the amount paid for the original ticket.

Multi-Day Tickets 
Multi-day tickets are currently not part of the seasonal pricing structure, but prices have been increased.

Multi-day tickets and any options purchased must be used within 14 days of first use, except for Florida Resident 3-Day and 4-Day Tickets. Florida Resident 3-Day and 4-Day Tickets expire 6 months after first use or December 17, 2017, whichever comes first, and may not be used on the following blockout dates:
  • March 19, 2016 to April 1, 2016;
  • June 6, 2016 to August 11, 2016;
  • December 15, 2016 to December 31; 2016;
  • January 1, 2017 to January 2, 2017;
  • April 8, 2017 to April 21, 2017;
  • June 5, 2017 to August 10, 2017.
All tickets and options are nontransferable and nonrefundable and exclude activities/events separately priced. Water Parks subject to rehabilitation, seasonal and weather closures.

NOTE: The information and prices included in this article were updated on February 28, 2016.

IMAGES AND TICKET PRICES: © 2016 Walt Disney World Resort. All Rights Reserved.

7 Comment(s):

I'm so glad the uk exchange rate is still quite good ATM as we can buy a 14 day unlimited Disney ticket with the memory maker for £299 which works out to be roughly $408.

Anonymous said...

News Report: Walt Disney just flipped over in his grave when he saw what his company is doing to the common people .. Also they are going to rename the parks to "Rich World".

Anonymous said...

What an elegant solution- rather than putting forth the effort to actually manage the crowd levels by adding attractions and improving guests' experience, just decrease the crowds, and then charge even more to make up the difference in sales! It amazes me how much time and effort they put into avoiding actually making their parks worth visiting.

Anonymous said...

Universal Studios started it! Disney will follow suit. It's all about the money.

Anonymous said...

Wow! What incredible ignorance this comment reveals. Epcot is adding a third Soarin' theater plus the new Frozen attraction and the meet and greet in Norway. Hollywood Studios is adding two whole new lands - Star Wars and Toy Story. Animal Kingdom is also adding a new land - Pandora - which will have 2 new attractions and a new restaurant, and their new evening World of Color type show is set to go online in the next few months. Magic Kingdom opened the new area of Fantasyland with 3 new attractions and an amazingly popular restaurant. And the new restaurant in Adventureland opened in the last couple of months. If that is not "putting forth the effort" by adding attractions and improving guests'experience, then what is?!?

Anonymous said...

The problem is Disney has too many Parks to keep all of them up to quality.
-AK's last new ride opened in 2006.
-DHS has lost over a dozen attractions. Yes new lands are on the way, but not for years. Hence the ticket price should go down until they open.
-Epcot will finally be getting new attractions this summer. (they will be great, I am designing parts of both)
-MK has added the most new attractions recently, but unfortunately they weren't that great or innovative. The big selling point for one of them is a swinging bucket seat for the ride that is just over 3 minutes from load to unload.
-Disney has no clue how to use technology responsibly. Entire families are glued to their phones more than ever. Vacations are experienced through a screen. The reliance on Fastpass + and the app needs to end. Most families don't travel to look at their phone in just a new location.
-Lastly many characters and shows are being reduced. This is what made Disney the most magical place on earth and it is being thrown out.

If the ticket prices were to have stayed at the current $107 a day and reduced prices for slower parts of the season this would be a different discussion. But there was not a $30 value jump from last summer to warrant that price hike, especially when the people at peak season get to do the least per day.

These criticisms come from a passion for the place. People don't want the legacy and the values of something that means so much to so many to be tarnished by greedy practices. Disney is what made me want to be an architect, and now I work for them. The current Disney will not be so inspiring to our youth.

Anonymous said...

I'm firmly of the point of view that Disney should be doing much more to add attractions and add to the value of park entry for their guests. But, until people start speaking loudly and clearly with their wallets, that is to say, stop going to the parks until a few years down the road when new lands and attractions do finally arrive, Disney will just continue to crank prices up and up and up. While many people complain that Disney is pricing many of us out of the market, year-over-year overall attendance numbers just continue to climb. Until people stop going and the attendance figures do actually go down, the price increases are just going to keep happening. I know this isn't a new concept, but every time prices are increased the same conversations take place, and yet people continue to go.

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