Did you know that, as a part of Disney’s commitment to the environment, the Walt Disney World bus fleet was converted to run on a cleaner fuel in 2015?
The conversion to this cleaner fuel made the Disney Transportation fleet one of the first in the country to run on R50, a renewable diesel (RD) that is made from used cooking oil and non-consumable food waste. A "Powered by Renewable Diesel" graphic will be added next to the bus number on the back of all buses.


Additionally, new signs (pictured below) will appear onboard all Disney buses starting this week. 


IMAGE: © 2016 Walt Disney World Resort. All Rights Reserved.

8 Comment(s):

Cindy said...

I'm doubting those numbers. "One of the first" and "50% from non-consumable food waste"? All marketing hype. The remainder is still from harvested oil. What ever happened to the electric buses they were testing in Fort Wilderness? they were beautifully quiet and had no fumes.

Anonymous said...

Cindy, just because something is electric, quiet, and has no fumes - this does not make it economically viable, workable, useable, desirable, etc.

Walking is "beautifully quiet" but it's days were numbered when the wheel was invented.

Otto said...

Disney is trying to sell this as green, it isn't. Ther are better alternatives to be realy green.

Yeah, I'm with Cindy. It's a good effort, but it's like saying "clean coal". That makes no sense. Hopefully Elon Musk will have a solution soon with a reliable electric bus. -that would be slick!

Anonymous said...

Electric buses would need to be recharged several times throughout the day. They are better at saving energy when going >30 mph and not constantly making stops.

Anonymous said...

There were a bunch of technical and mechanical problems with the buses used in the trials at the Fort. These trials were being done while I was still a bus driver, so I know a bit about them. The trial buses also would not fit under the monorail beam. They may get reconsidered now that there is the second loop at MK but that was a big problem during the trials.

Regenerative breaking dumps power back into the battery, saving break pads and the driver's foot.

Will Davis said...

"Electric buses would need to be recharged several times throughout the day. They are better at saving energy when going >30 mph and not constantly making stops."

No, this is false, a decent electric bus these days has a range of 300 miles or more. That's plenty for a disney bus.

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