SeaWorld saves their 1,000th turtle and more


As always, SeaWorld stands as one of the organizations that really care about the environment and its wildlife.
Take a look at these two posts, from Inside SeaWorld, that shows how they saved a turtle and a manatee:
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1,000 and counting

sea turtle released
Around SeaWorld Orlando, this loggerhead sea turtles is known as "Mr. 1,000."

He was brought to SeaWorld in September 2010 by the Sea Turtle Preservation Society of Brevard County after he was found in the wild, suffering from "lockjaw."  When he arrived at SeaWorld, he weighed only 72 lbs.  Now, after months of hands-on care and TLC by SeaWorld's experts, he weighs over 100 lbs and on March 11 was returned to the waters off Cape Canaveral National Seashore to once again tackle life in the wild.

He was brought to SeaWorld in September 2010 by the Sea Turtle Preservation Society of Brevard County after he was found in the wild, suffering from "lockjaw."  When he arrived at SeaWorld, he weighed only 72 lbs.  Now, after months of hands-on care and TLC by SeaWorld's experts, he weighs over 100 lbs and on March 11 was returned to the waters off Cape Canaveral National Seashore to once again tackle life in the wild.



He's the 1,000 sea turtle to be returned to the wild by the team of turtle experts at SeaWorld Orlando.
Since SeaWorld Orlando's sea turtle rescue program began in 1980, more than 1,530 sea turtles have been cared for by the park's vets and animal team.  Each sea turtle was rescued by the staff or brought to the park due to cold stress, injuries from nets, fishing line and hooks, ingestion of trash such as plastic bags, boat strikes, natural causes and most recently, oil contamination.

The team's success rate in caring for turtles with such a wide variety of injuries is amazingly high: 68% of the turtles brought to SeaWorld in the past 30 years have been returned to the wild. 
What should you do if you find an injured, orphaned or ill animal?
First, don’t approach the animal – be safe and keep your distance. Next, contact your local wildlife agency and be prepared to detail the animal’s exact location and its condition.


In Florida, contact FWC, 24/7, at 1-888-404-FWCC (1-888-404-3922). In other states contact your local wildlife agency.
SeaWorld is a global leader in the rescue and rehabilitation of sea turtles. The park’s Animal Rescue & Rehabilitation Team is in on call 365 days a year, 24 hours a day to care for all kinds of marine animals including sea turtles -- like "Mr. 1,000" -- dolphins, manatees and whales.
Learn more about SeaWorld's conservation efforts and animal rescue teams at SeaWorldCares.com.

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Now, take a look at this other update, from Inside SeaWorld too, that shows how they returned a manatee to its natural place:

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SeaWorld Orlando's animal rescue team returns two-time residents, Kringle the manatee, to the wild

On Thursday, March 3, SeaWorld Orlando’s animal team returned Kringle, a male manatee, to waters near Port St. John in Titusville on Florida’s east coast.
Kringle is not your typical rehabilitated manatee. He’s a two-time resident of the park, having been rescued just days after Christmas in 2008 (and with his rescue came his holiday name), and again in December 2010.  We think he likes staying at SeaWorld during the holidays!

Both times, Kringle was suffering from early signs of cold-stress and hypothermia, a condition that occurs when manatees can’t find warm water. 

Prior to his release, the 8-foot-long, 770-pound manatee was fitted with a satellite tag.  The tag allows Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to track Kringle’s movements in the wild to ensure his success.

Kringle is the 9th rehabilitated manatee released this year by SeaWorld Orlando’s animal experts. 
SeaWorld’s animal rescue team, is on call 24/7 to rescue orphaned, injured or ill animals.  More than 18,000 animals have been rescued since the parks’ care programs began 45 years ago.  Want to learn more about our efforts with caring for animals like Kringle?  Go to SeaWorldCares.com.
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Nice job, SeaWorld!
All pictures and info are subject to the copyright of the SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment Company. All rights are strictly reserved. PHOTOS and info from InsideSeaWorld.com.

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